Friday, October 20, 2017

Types of Violin Strings

The former vice president of Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Erol Onel leverages nearly two decades of medical and clinical research experience to lead Heron Therapeutics as vice president. Outside of work, Erol Onel maintains a passion for music and plays several instruments, including the violin.

Violin strings are divided into three general categories: steel core, gut, and synthetic core.

Gut strings, also known as gut core strings, are popular among violinists who enjoy playing baroque music. These strings, which create a warm sound with rich overtones, were the only type of violin string available until the 1800s. Unfortunately, gut strings are extremely temperamental and often change when exposed to humidity and different temperatures. Further, they are more expensive and less durable than other types.

Capable of producing a focused and bright tone, steel core strings were invented as an alternative to gut strings. As such, they improve upon many of the downfalls of gut strings, including sensitivity to temperature. Steel core strings are great for students because they are easy to work with in terms of tuning. Meanwhile, the brighter sound produced by steel core strings makes them a popular choice among violinists who play bluegrass, folk music, and jazz.

Synthetic core strings feature characteristics of both steel and gut core strings. Made from nylon and composite fibers, they feature the warm sound of gut strings and the durability and pitch stability of steel strings. This unique combination of attributes makes synthetic core strings a good choice for beginning and expert violinists playing a variety of musical genres.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.